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Great Firewall of China

Posted: December 29th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Technoid, Technoid Computer News | Tags: , , , , , | Comments Off on Great Firewall of China

Technoid - Great Firewall of ChinaChinese internet users who are skilled at evading the country’s online blocks have suddenly found they are again being denied access to some websites. In China, if you want access to forbidden websites including Facebook or Twitter, one of the easiest ways is to use a virtual private network (VPN).

However, in recent days VPNs across China have been either inaccessible or swiftly shut down. Service providers have blamed the outage on an update to the so-called Great Firewall, which the Chinese government uses to control internet access.

They say the upgraded firewall appears to have the ability to discover and block attempts to circumvent online censorship. The block has also hurt some international businesses that use the networks for secure communications. The firewall has been built up since the internet began to develop in China. It uses a range of technologies to block access to particular sites from Chinese computers  :: Read the full article »»»»


Australia, A Shameful History

Posted: September 17th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: STANDOUT | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Australia, A Shameful History

A Shameful History - Australia's Indigenous Deaths In Custody Kwementyaye Briscoe

In 1987 Australia kicked off it’s Royal Commission Into Aboriginal Deaths In Custody RCIADIC 1987-1991 – The basis for the commision, as it’s title suggests, was in response to a growing public concern that deaths in custody of Aboriginal people were too common and public explanations were too evasive to discount the possibility that foul play was a factor in many of them.

The terms of the commision were broad, a brief outline suggested that between 1980 – 1989, 99 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders died in the custody of prison, police or juvenile detention institutions. They were 88 males and 11 females. Their average age at death was thirty-two years, Their deaths were premature. The circumstances of their deaths were extremely varied.

There seemed to be no common thread of abuse, neglect or racism that contributed to these 99 deaths. However, an examination of the lives of the victims showed that facts associated in every case with their Aboriginality played a significant and in most cases dominant role in their being in custody and dying in custody. To this day there remains almost a complete lack of understanding, and more importantly no solid prevention regime  to curb this vast waste of life.

I note with trepidation that the 1934-35 Moseley Royal Commisionwhich looked very briefly at a similarly high proportion of indigenous deaths in custody – had similar findings to that of the 1987 RCIADIC. Of course the Moseley Royal Commision looked into increasing the powers of the Chief Protector of Aborigines, which it indeed did, leaving us with the stolen generation. We must surely be asking ourselves what we’re doing wrong here?

As the Northern Territory Coroner prepares to hand down his findings of the death-in-custody of an Aboriginal man, Kwementyaye Briscoe, in an Alice Springs Police Station, Australians must surely be asking what are we doing wrong? :: Read the full article »»»»


New Choice Report Says Australians are Paying 50 Per Cent More For Tech!?

Posted: July 19th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Technoid, Technoid Computer News | Tags: , , , , , , , | Comments Off on New Choice Report Says Australians are Paying 50 Per Cent More For Tech!?

New Choice Report Says Australians are Paying 50 Per Cent More For TechAustralian consumer watchdog Choice says locals are paying twice as much as they should for computer hardware, software and digital downloads. In it’s latest research – The Digital Price Divide – the consumer group says Australian prices for products such as music, personal computers, console games and computer software are on average 50 per cent higher than those in the United States.

In a submission to the parliamentary inquiry into IT pricing, the group noted that across 44 software products, Australian prices were 34 per cent more expensive than comparative overseas prices. Choice also found that Australians are paying 51% more for iTunes music, 88% more for Wii games and 41% more for computer hardware than US consumers.

One piece of Microsoft software was nearly $9,000 more expensive in Australia than the United States, Choice said via it’s website that it would be cheaper to pay someone’s wage and fly them to the US and back twice, and get them to buy the software while overseas :: Read the full article »»»»


READ A BOOK: Cinder by Marissa Meyer

Posted: March 1st, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Read A Book | Tags: , , , , , , | Comments Off on READ A BOOK: Cinder by Marissa Meyer

Cinder - Marissa Meyer - Jan 2012

It’s almost impossible to miss,  spend 15 minutes on the internet and your sure to bump into some mention or other of Marissa Meyer’s Cinder, a new dystopian novel placing a pot of cyborgs, magical powers and evil stepmothers on the boil.

Cinder is the debut novel of New York Times bestselling author Marissa Meyer . The story is loosely based on the classic fairytale “Cinderella”. Though Cinder is aimed squarley at a young adult/scifi audience, it’s a surprising good read for those of us who have managed to grow facial hair.  Cinder was selected as one of IndieBound’s Kids’ Next List for winter 2012. Read the full article »»»»


READ A BOOK: Cinder by Marissa Meyer

Posted: March 1st, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Read A Book | Tags: , , , , , , | Comments Off on READ A BOOK: Cinder by Marissa Meyer

Cinder - Marissa Meyer - Jan 2012

It’s almost impossible to miss,  spend 15 minutes on the internet and your sure to bump into some mention or other of Marissa Meyer’s Cinder, a new dystopian novel placing a pot of cyborgs, magical powers and evil stepmothers on the boil.

Cinder is the debut novel of New York Times bestselling author Marissa Meyer . The story is loosely based on the classic fairytale “Cinderella”. Though Cinder is aimed squarley at a young adult/scifi audience, it’s a surprising good read for those of us who have managed to grow facial hair.  Cinder was selected as one of IndieBound’s Kids’ Next List for winter 2012. Read the full article »»»»