Level Nine Sports, where families ski and ride...
 

 advertise with indeep media

Tech Giants Scramble to Fix ‘Freak’

Posted: March 10th, 2015 | Author: | Filed under: Technoid Computer News | Tags: , , , , | Comments Off on Tech Giants Scramble to Fix ‘Freak’

Get Your Freak OnAs Google, Apple and Microsoft scramble to patch a long missed security flaw it might be timely to remember how we got here. Way back at the latter end of the last century – the 1990s, when Netscape browser was all the rage and – SSL (Secure Socket Layer) encryption was brand-spanking-new, the U.S. government wanted control over export of “weapons grade” encryption.

Its theory was that domestic communications could benefit from stronger, 128-bit encryption, but ‘backdoors’ should be available to U.S. intelligence and law enforcement when it came to foreign communications, the concept of weaker, “export grade” encryption was born.

Turns out that this theory and it’s legacy backdoor, a vulnerability that we’ve come to know in recent days as ‘FREAK’ still exists in up to 30 percent of U.S. web servers. It’s a sad example of how zombie-security from the era that gave us grunge can come back and bite us on the posterior.

Meanwhile, Apple and Google are saying they’ve developed fixes/patches – though we note Apple has yet to deploy –  to mitigate the ‘Freak’ security flaw. Initially thought to be immune, Microsoft released an advisory which warned hundreds of millions of Windows PC users are also vulnerable to the security vulnerability :: Read the full article »»»»


Millions of Linkedin User Passwords Hacked

Posted: June 7th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: HACK! | Tags: , , , | Comments Off on Millions of Linkedin User Passwords Hacked

Millions of Linkedin User Passwords HackedThat hub of corporate social networking, LinkedIn is investigating claims that over 6 million of its users’ passwords were leaked onto the internet. Linkedin, which has over 150 million users, is designed to allow professionals to share resume details and network with one like minded corporates.

Hackers have reportedly posted a file containing encrypted passwords onto a Russian web forum. The company has confirmed the leak and says it is currently looking into the reports.

Linkedin Statement: We want to provide you with an update on this morning’s reports of stolen passwords. We can confirm that some of the passwords that were compromised correspond to LinkedIn accounts. We are continuing to investigate this situation and here is what we are pursuing as far as next steps for the compromised accounts :: Read the full article »»»»


Android Flaw Allows Outside Control

Posted: February 24th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Technoid Computer News | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Android Flaw Allows Outside Control

Android Flaw Opens Devices To Outside ControlCyber-security experts have uncovered a serious flaw in a component of the operating system of Google’s widely used Android smartphone that they say hackers can exploit to gain control of the devices. Researchers from startup cyber-security firm CrowdStrike said they have figured out how to use that bug to launch attacks and take control of some Android devices.

CrowdStrike – which will demonstrate its findings next week at RSA 2012 in San Francisco – said an attacker sends an email or text message that appears to be from a trusted source, like the user’s phone carrier. The message urges the recipient to click on a link, which if done infects the device. At that point, the hacker gains complete control of the phone, enabling him or her to eavesdrop on phone calls and monitor the location of the device, said Dmitri Alperovitch, chief technology officer and co-founder of CrowdStrike. Read the full article »»»


Android Flaw Allows Outside Control

Posted: February 24th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Technoid Computer News | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Android Flaw Allows Outside Control

Android Flaw Opens Devices To Outside ControlCyber-security experts have uncovered a serious flaw in a component of the operating system of Google’s widely used Android smartphone that they say hackers can exploit to gain control of the devices. Researchers from startup cyber-security firm CrowdStrike said they have figured out how to use that bug to launch attacks and take control of some Android devices.

CrowdStrike – which will demonstrate its findings next week at RSA 2012 in San Francisco – said an attacker sends an email or text message that appears to be from a trusted source, like the user’s phone carrier. The message urges the recipient to click on a link, which if done infects the device. At that point, the hacker gains complete control of the phone, enabling him or her to eavesdrop on phone calls and monitor the location of the device, said Dmitri Alperovitch, chief technology officer and co-founder of CrowdStrike. Read the full article »»»


Apple Factory Hacked In Global Protest

Posted: February 17th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Technoid | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Apple Factory Hacked In Global Protest

Apple Factory Hacked In Global ProtestAsher Moses from SMH Digital-Life is reporting that the world’s biggest tech manufacturer Foxconn has been hacked and highly sensitive data leaked online amid a global protest stunt against working conditions in the factories that make Apple’s iPhones and iPads. The hacktivist group know as Swagg Security broke into Foxconn’s systems using a vulnerability contained in an old version of Internet Explorer that had been installed on a staff member’s computer.

SwaggSec published a file on the open internet containing much of the pilfered information including the username and password used by Foxconn boss Terry Gou. The leak also meant miscreants could place bogus orders with Foxconn, which has since shut down affected servers. Foxconn has been at the centre of a sustained storm around working conditions in Chinese factories. It has numerous partners including IBM and Dell but Apple has received by far the most flack from activists looking to press the company into taking leadership on the issue.

Read more at smh digital life